COURSE LIST - HEALTH SCIENCE

LEGEND:

SEMESTER 1

603-101-MQ INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to analyze and produce various forms of discourse.

Competencies to be developed are:

  • To identify the characteristics and functions of the components of literary texts
  • To determine the organizations of facts and arguments of a given literary text
  • To prepare ideas and strategies for a projected discourse
  • To explicate a discourse
  • To edit the discourse

All competencies lead to the production of an approximately 750-word essay.

345-101-MQ KNOWLEDGE

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to apply a logical and analytical process of thinking to how knowledge is organized and used.

Competencies to be developed are:

  • To recognize the basic elements of a field of knowledge
  • To define the modes of organizations and utilization of a field of knowledge
  • To situate a field of knowledge within its historical context
  • To organize the main components into coherent patterns
  • To produce a synthesis of the main components

 

602-100-MQ BASIC FRENCH

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to apply basic concepts for communicating in standard French.

Competencies to be developed include:

  • Writing and revising a simple text
  • Understanding the meaning of a simple text
  • Conveying a simple oral message
  • Understanding the meaning of a simple oral message

 

201-NYA-05 CAL I: Differential calculus

Course description:

This course establishes the foundations of differential calculus for its use in pure and applied sciences. It prepares students, in particular, for the courses, Mechanics, Modern Physics, and Integral Calculus. The course explains the conceptual bases of differential calculus, i.e. the notions of a function, variation of a function, and limit, and applies them to concrete situations.

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize and describe the characteristics a function represented in the form of a symbolic expression or in graphic form
  2. Determine if a function has a limit, is continuous, is differentiable, at a point and over an interval
  3. Apply the rules and techniques of derivation
  4. Use the derivative and the concepts related to analyze the variations of a function and draw its graph
  5. Solve optimization and rate of change issues

 

202-NYA-05 GENERAL CHEMISTRY: MATTER

Course description:

Designed as an extension of concepts learned in high school, this course prepares students for the chemistry of solutions, organic chemistry, and biology courses while introducing them to laboratory work. The student is called upon to establish the relevant links between phenomena and fundamental concepts and verify them from data provided or observations obtained in the laboratory.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the probabilistic model of the atom to the analysis of the properties of elements
  2. Solve problems affecting the structure and states of matter in using modern theories of chemistry
  3. Apply the laws of stoichiometry to the study of chemical phenomena
  4. Experimentally verify the physical and chemical properties of matter

 

203-NYA-05 MECHANICS

Course description:

As an extension of the notions of mechanics already studied in high school, this course will teach students to develop a rigorous working method through the resolution of physical problems and the explanation of various phenomena of everyday life by verifying them experimentally.

This course uses the mathematical concepts and skills acquired in the Differential Calculus course as well as certain concepts addressed concurrently in the Integral Calculus course. The course helps to equip the student with knowledge and know-how specific to a rigorous scientific approach: observation, modeling, comparison of theoretical models with real behavior, and validation of hypotheses.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the translational and rotational movement of bodies
  2. Apply the concepts and laws of dynamics in the analysis of the movement of bodies
  3. Perform calculations of work and energy in simple situations
  4. Apply the principles of conservation of mechanics
  5. Experimentally verify the laws and principles related to mechanics

The concepts introduced in this course will subsequently be used in the Electricity and Magnetism and Waves and Modern Physics courses.

SEMESTER 2

603-102-MQ LITERARY GENRES

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to apply a critical approach to literary genres.

Competencies to be developed are:

  • To distinguish genres of literary texts
  • To recognize the use of literary conventions within a specific genre
  • To situate work within its historical and literary period
  • To explicate a discourse and representative of a literary genre
  • To edit the discourse

All competencies lead to the effective presentation of an approximately 1000 word integrated response to a text.

602-TVA-TV FRENCH FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAMS

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to apply basic concepts for communicating in the French language in relation to the student’s field of study.

Competencies to be developed include:

  • Writing and revising a short text related to the student’s field of study
  • Understanding the meaning and characteristics of a text related to the student’s field of study
  • Conveying a simple oral message related to the student’s field of study
  • Understanding the meaning of a simple oral message related to the student’s field of study

 

109-101-MQ PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to analyze one’s physical activity from the perspective of trends in health relating to lifestyle choices.

Competencies to be developed include:

  • Establishing the relationship between one’s lifestyle habits and their health
  • Being physically active in a manner that promotes good health
  • Recognizing one’s needs, abilities, and motivational factors with respect to regular and sufficient physical activity
  • To propose physical activities and nutritional guidance that promote a healthy lifestyle

 

201-NYB-05 CAL II - INTEGRAL CALCULUS

Course description:

This course establishes the bases of integral calculus with a view of its applications to concrete situations: calculation of the area under a curve, calculation of the area and volume of solids, calculation of the length of a portion of a curve. The course follows and relies heavily on the concepts developed in Differential Calculus by consisting of doing the reverse operation of the derivation.

At the end of this course, students will be able

  1. Determine the indefinite integral of a function
  2. Calculate the limits of functions with indeterminate forms
  3. Calculate definite integral and the improper integral of a function over an interval
  4. Translate concrete problems in the form of differential equations and solve simple differential equations
  5. Calculate volumes, areas, and lengths to construct graphic representations in the plane and in space
  6. Analyze the convergence of a series

 

202-NYB-05 CHEMISTRY OF SOLUTIONS

Course description:

This second chemistry course deepens understanding, more quantitatively, of the basic theories relating to the nature of matter in aqueous solutions through its physical and chemical properties. Students will establish links between fundamental phenomena and concepts using models of approximations.

Students will experimentally verify certain theoretical models, establish their limits, and analyze them in order to establish the causes of variation in the results obtained. The practical work thus makes students able to criticize their results and to estimate the degree of precision and reproducibility.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Analyze the colligative properties of solutions
  • Resolve problems related to the kinetics of reactions in solutions
  • Resolve the problems related to chemical equilibrium
  • Experimentally verify certain properties of solutions
  • Experimentally determine certain characteristics of reactions in solutions

 

101-NYA-05 GENERAL BIOLOGY I

Course description:

This course is the first biology course in the program, which presents the organization of living things in a hierarchical fashion, from the most fundamental level of life, the cell, to its most global level, the maintenance and the complexity of life on Earth.

At the end of this course, students will be able:

  1. Distinguish the relationships between the structures and functions of certain levels of organization of living things
  2. Analyze the mechanisms responsible for the genetic variation of living things
  3. Appreciate the action of the mechanisms of evolution of diversity and life complexity
  4. Analyze the integration of living in a community
  5. Explain the transformation process of matter and of energy

Students will also be able to recognize the characteristics of a rigorous scientific approach in the originality of the approach of some biologists who have marked the evolution of this science and to hold a critical discourse on current technological applications in the domain.

SEMESTER 3

603-103-MQ LITERARY THEMES

Course Description: 

The general objective of this course is to enable the student to apply a critical approach to a literary theme. The student will study various examples in English literature in order to understand how well-known authors unify their works around themes.

Further, the student will be able to read various selections of unfamiliar literature, either fiction or non-fiction, and discuss them intelligibly in writing through the understanding of their themes.

By the end of this course, the student will apply their understanding of the theme by writing an analysis of a literary text (an approximately 1000 word paper.)

345-102-MQ WORLD VIEWS

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to apply a critical thought process to world views.

Competencies to be developed are:

  • To describe world views
  • To explain the major ideas, values, and implications of a worldview
  • To organize the ideas, values, and experiences of a worldview into coherent patterns
  • To compare world views
  • To convey the ideas, attitudes, and experiences of the societies or groups studied

 

109-102-MQ PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EFFECTIVENESS

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to improve one’s effectiveness when practicing physical activity.

Competencies to be developed include:

  • Planning an approach to improve one’s effectiveness when practicing a physical activity
  • Using a planned approach to improve one’s physical health

 

420-TVB-TV USE OF MICROCOMPUTER SOFTWARE

Course Description: 

This elective course approaches the novel technology of 3D printing with an interdisciplinary perspective and opens it up to all DEC program students at the College. The course aggregates several disciplines into one coherent learning experience by drawing on perspectives of:

  • Mathematics
  • Design
  • Physics
  • Computer science
  • Engineering
  • Biology

In today’s world, every field and every industry needs innovative thinkers that can make a difference. Inquiry-based learning is a 21st-century teaching and learning philosophy that requires students to not only be “problem solvers”, but “problem finders” as well. Instead of simply presenting established facts, teachers guide students to discover their worlds and how they could make it better. This is accomplished by posing questions, challenging the norm, and pushing the boundaries. Innovation is a keyword at the core of this philosophy.

No other technology, since the invention of the computer has the potential to positively impact education and learning as the 3D printer. 3D printers are now being used in practically every field. Learning how to use them is becoming as essential a skill as reading and writing.

From the medical field, automotive and aerospace industry, fashion, food, and architecture, 3D printers are becoming a regular on- the scene. Putting the world of 3D printing in the hands of students will help better prepare them to shape their world and be innovative in their field of choice.

This course, on the fundamentals of CAD design for rapid prototyping and 3D printing, provides all of the foundational knowledge necessary to bring the world of 3D printing to the students and start their journey to innovation in whichever field they choose to pursue.

201-NYC-05 LINEAR ALGEBRA AND VECTOR GEOMETRY

Course description:

This course introduces students to the notions of linear algebra and vector geometry and to develop tools that can be used in particular, in the physics course, Electricity and magnetism given in the 4th session, but concurrently in the context of applications specific to the natural sciences, mathematics, economics, and computer science, at the pre-university level. The main subjects of study are matrix calculus, geometric and algebraic vectors, the structure of vector space, and representations and equations of geometric loci in the plane and in space.

At the end of this course, students will be able:

  1. Translate concrete problems in the form of linear equations
  2. Solve systems of linear equations using matrix methods
  3. Establish links between geometry and algebra
  4. Establish the equation of geometric loci (lines and planes) and determine their intersections
  5. Calculate angles, lengths, areas, and volumes
  6. Demonstrate propositions
  7. Construct representations of geometric places in the plane and in space

 

203-NYB-05 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM

Course description:

Using several notions seen in mechanics: kinematics, forces, potential and kinetic energies, the moment of force, etc. and using the concepts of mathematics acquired in the differential calculus and integral calculus courses, widely used in the analysis of a continuous distribution system of stationary or moving electric charges, this course is an introduction to electric and magnetic phenomena. Starting from the formulation of the laws of electromagnetism, students will be able to explain the overall functioning of the various devices and the mechanisms describing the electrical and magnetic phenomena and also to apply electromagnetism in situations of everyday life.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze physical situations related to electric charges at rest and to electric current
  2. Analyze physical situations related to magnetism and magnetic induction
  3. Apply the laws of electricity and magnetism
  4. Experimentally verify the laws of electricity and magnetism

 

101-250- TV GENERAL BIOLOGY II

Course description:

In this course, students are to introduce the fields of cell and molecular biology. At the end of the course, students will be able to explain how current ideas and theories, that have been developed by cell biologists and molecular biologists, reveal the basic mechanisms by which cells and organisms function. Human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of the organization. Selected topics in physiology will focus on: basic anatomical and directional terminology; fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology and cell physiology; tissues (histology); nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, and reproductive systems with an emphasis on the regulation of homeostasis; relationships between structure and function.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize the relationship between structure and function at different levels of the organization
  • To apply the concept of homeostasis to the study of systems in animals
  • To explain the functions of conservation, regulation, and reproduction in multicellular organisms
  • To understand and apply the scientific method

 

SEMESTER 4

603-TVE-TV ENGLISH ADAPTED TO PROGRAM

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to communicate in the forms of discourse appropriate to one or more fields of study, focusing on citation styles and preparing the student for university-level writing.

Competencies to be developed include:

  • Identifying the forms of discourse appropriate to given fields of study
  • Recognizing the discursive frameworks appropriate to given fields of study
  • Analyze and succinctly explain the main ideas of an oral and written discourse

 

109-103-MQ PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND AUTONOMY

Course Description: 

The objective of this course is to demonstrate one’s ability to assume responsibility for maintaining a healthy lifestyle through the continued practice of physical activity.

Competencies to be developed include:

  • Planning a personal physical activity program
  • Combining the elements of a regular and sufficient practice of physical activity as part of a healthy lifestyle
  • Manage a personal physical activity program

 

345-TVH-TV CRITICAL THOUGHT APPLIED TO WORLD ISSUES

Course description:

The objective of this course is to apply a critical thought process to ethical issues relevant to the field of study.

Competencies to be developed include:

  • Situating significant ethical issues within appropriate world views and fields of knowledge
  • explaining the major ideas, values, and social implications of ethical issues
  • organizing the ethical questions and their implications into coherent patterns
  • Debating ethical issues

 

203-NYC-05 WAVES, OPTICS AND MODERN PHYSICS

Course description:

In this third physics course in the program, students will have to use the notions of mathematics acquired in the Differential Calculus, Integral Calculus, and Mechanics courses. Students will use functions with several independent variables necessary for the description of waves and obtain certain characteristics of them, which have recourse to partial derivatives and to integrals.

From revolutionary discoveries on several aspects of the Universe and of matter, students will be introduced, in particular, to geometric and wave optics, to the structure of matter and to radioactivity, to mechanical waves and vibrations, to the electromagnetic spectrum and relativity, which are notions useful both for students of the health, pure and applied or computer sciences.

The approaches followed will address the history of the main discoveries and will stress the importance of the major fundamental questions in physics, relating to science, technology, and social progress.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the basic principles of physics to the description of vibrations, waves, and their propagation
  2. Apply the laws of geometrical optics
  3. Apply the characteristics of waves to light phenomena
  4. Analyze situations based on notions of modern physics
  5. Experimentally verify the laws and principles related to waves, optics, and modern physics

 

202-200-TV ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Course description:

While integrating the knowledge and skills already acquired in the previous two chemistry courses, this course familiarizes students with the main functions of organic chemistry as well as their use in the study of chemical reactions. It provides students with the essential knowledge for understanding the structure and properties of complex molecules in the biological, biochemical, and biomedical sciences and sensitizes them to the various implications of organic chemistry in the world in which they live. Practical laboratory exercises will allow students to develop their dexterity and initiative in techniques of distillation, chromatography, and the extraction of natural and synthetic products.

During theoretical sessions, students will correctly identify chemical compounds, recognize them among all mono and polyfunctional chemical compounds or biochemical compounds, and establish a link between their molecular structure and their main physical properties, their reactivity, and their biological effects.

In the laboratory sessions, students will apply an experimental approach in three stages: synthesis and isolation, purification, determination of the purity of an organic, liquid, or solid compound, and analysis of the results with data from the scientific literature.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the rules of nomenclature to simple organic compounds
  2. Represent the three-dimensional structure of organic compounds from their planar structural formula
  3. Distinguish the different types of isomerism: structural, geometric, and optical
  4. Recognize the different types of reagents: nucleophiles, electrophiles, radicals, Lewis acids, and bases
  5. Determine the reactivity of simple organic functions such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, organomagnesium, halogenated derivatives, alcohols using the main types of reaction mechanism: SN1, SN2, E1, E2
  6. Theoretically conceive methods for the synthesis of simple organic compounds from given products
  7. Describe the main simple chemical functions useful in biology and biochemistry: amines, carboxylic acids, and derivatives, lipids, amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates
  8. Prepare, separate, and identify simple organic compounds

 

360-200- TV INTEGRATION PROJECT

Course description:

This course is an extension of the comprehensive assessment that must be successfully completed in order to obtain a DEC in Science. By the end of the course, students will have demonstrated the integration of the general goals of the Science program.

Integration, in the context of this course, means to possess the ability to clearly make: connections between the elements of the student’s learning, to recombine knowledge in various ways, and to put them to use in order to adapt to new situations. To this end, students will be asked to propose, conduct and present a research project on a scientific theme of their choice.

The integration project is multidisciplinary in its approach and should take into account not only the specific components of the program but also, its components of general education as well.

The course is designed to support students throughout their independent projects by providing relevant theoretical guidance as the projects progress. The projects require students to draw on prior knowledge from previous courses as well as provide them with the opportunity to engage in personal, stimulating, and creative work in their chosen area of personal interest. The choice of a project should ultimately reflect the student’s learning goals throughout their DEC.

Updated: March 11, 2022

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